Royal Ascot Day

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Die erste Royal Ascot-Rennwoche, oder Royal Meeting, fand statt und steht bis heute Der Gold Cup-Renntag ist auch als Ladies' Day (Damentag) bekannt, an dem die weiblichen Besucher besonders extravagante Hüte tragen. Finden Sie perfekte Stock-Fotos zum Thema Royal Ascot Day 3 sowie redaktionelle Newsbilder von Getty Images. Wählen Sie aus erstklassigen Inhalten. Finden Sie perfekte Stock-Fotos zum Thema Royal Ascot Ladies Day sowie redaktionelle Newsbilder von Getty Images. Wählen Sie aus erstklassigen. Royal Ascot Day Juni Besuchen Sie uns aus Anlaß der Renntage in Ascot mit Ihrem schönsten Hut. Uhr Ankunft HRM Queen. Von Anna Hochsieder. Royal Ascot, which takes place in June each year, is one of the highlights of Britain's social season. We invite you to spend a day at the.

Royal Ascot Day

12 Uhr Präsentation des diesjährigen Royal Ascot Day – Cocktails Bei Weinbau-​Familie Leopold mit den schönen Blumen von Frau Erna am. ROYAL ASCOT DAY 1! ⁣ ⁣ My outfit today is from the incredible new collection @catherinewalkerlondon with a hat to match as well! 🥰⁣ ⁣. With the Royal Ascot meeting spread over five days, many people also use the various car parks to have picnics before the racing. Others party into the evening​. Royal Ascot Day He has won Knobelspiele Online times from 1m 3f to 1m 6f on soft ground and on the all-weather. Royal Ascot — Which is the best day to go? Hughie Morrison. They might sing Rule Britannia with gusto but they will have been just as enthusiastic for the French, African, Indian — even Finnish — music at other concerts over the season. He was a horse picked up on the cheap from John Godsen. View all. Recommended Rs Online Aktionscode.

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Royal Ascot 2019, Day 1

Royal Ascot Day Video

Royal Ascot - Queen Anne Stakes 2020 Warum Sie auf Tripadvisor buchen sollten? Fotos, die mit den Kampagnen-Hashtags veröffentlicht wurden, werden in ein riesiges Regenbogenmosaikbild umgewandelt, Bedava Casino Oyunlari Oyna Book Of Ra auf der Rennbahn von Ascot dauerhaft angebracht wird. The viewing position of the stand is in prime location — right in front of the winning line. These racegoers want a top Royal Jugar Book Of Ra Gratis Online experience. Teilen Sie Ihr bestes Reisefoto. Die Herren tragen traditionsgemäss einen schwarzen oder grauen Cutaway. The Royal Meeting hier: königliche Anwesenheit Royal Meeting is no less famous for its eccentric millinery Damenhüte millinery than for its equestrian event Pferdesportveranstaltung equestrian events. Kultur Flsch Player, Ladies DayPferderennenPferdesport. Cookies Wir verwenden kalorienfreie Cookies, um dir eine bessere Browser-Erfahrung zu bieten, Inhalte und Anzeigen zu personalisieren, Funktionen für soziale Medien bereitzustellen und unseren Traffic zu analysieren. Geschäftsbereich Charlottenstr.

He won on his last start for Gosden but was 6th of 12 at Newcastle over 1m 2f 15 days ago and it was suggested that the run was needed.

That was the only race out of his 6 runs that he has failed to place in and with dropping down in the trip and has low mileage and weight is in favour as well 9st 4lbs.

He was a winner when last seen 15 days ago at Kempton over 1m beating Defence Girl by 7f. He took a big step forward in his progression in that run and he should have even more to offer as the run at Kempton was prep for today.

He got off the mark at Naas over 1m and that was over 1m on heavy ground. He was runner up last week to stablemate Cormorant when 2nd of 5 at Leopardstown and is set for another big run.

Berlin Tango will also look to be part of the run-in. With Champion jockey Oisin Murphy on board he will look to make a challenge.

Connections won the race last race with Sangaruis and I believe they will edge this again. Top of the market betting for Royal Ascot is Kipps who is looking to win of a low mark of 8st 4lbs.

He is a winner at 1m 2f on the AW. He was beaten by a nose when second last time out Haydock and will look to have another big run here.

Convict is another who will look to go well for William Haggas and Tom Marquand who has improved on each of his runs and it is expected to improve for that.

In the big race of the day, Japan is the big name at Royal Ascot on Wednesday. The connections for Addeybb will be hoping for a bit of rain which is forecasted so they will have fingers crossed for that and he will be a big player in this for William Haggas and Tom Marquand.

Suggestions are that this may be a little quick for him but he was last seen beating Elarqam by a head 10 days ago. He is a winner of 5 races from 1m to 1m 2f on ground varying from good to heavy and on the All-Weather.

He is carrying a 5lb penalty for that run, but he could well overcome that. With both jockey Oisin Murphy and trainer Andrew Baldwin in form.

He is expected to offer more and be a big player here. He has been unlucky in his last couple of runs but he is one to watch and gives trainer Mark Johnson his best chance for a win in this race.

He has a speedy pedigree and with the booking of Moore on board, it is a bold one. He will use that run to his advantage and look to be a main challenger.

Tactical is another expected player in this who made a good account of himself on his debut at Newmarket when 3rd 13 days ago.

This is the second runner of the day for the Queen and has a good chance for trainer A Balding and Jockey James Doyle.

But I am tipping a horse to win and an each way betting tip. He was a winner on debut at Gulfstream in April when Evens favourite over 4f.

Trainer Archie Watson is in good form but Jockey Hollie Doyle has lit up the track since the return of racing in Britain and I think will give another showing of why she is one of the top jockeys in the country.

He has won 3 times from 1m 3f to 1m 6f on soft ground and on the all-weather. With rain falling and more rain expected. He will like the ground on the softer side.

He will be one to get involved in the run in and I feel he has a good chance. Page Contents. Claim Here Claim Here. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit.

Min odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. As the debate intensified, Mr Farage dismissed Mr Femi as an 'extremist'.

We want racial equality and fairness in our society. Social media users accused Eamonn Holmes of 'racism', claiming he kept interrupting Femi - who retweeted a series of posts criticising Holmes and Farage.

Mr Oluwole also accused Holmes of 'shutting him down' when he tried to stray off the topic of the Proms. The host pointed responded that the activist was booked to discuss his objections to Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory and told him 'if you don't have any objections to them let us know'.

And at one point Holmes interrupted Femi to take issue with his interpretation of the Irish anthem.

Here they come blaming others. Mr Holmes asked: 'Do you have an issue with the word slave used in the Irish national anthem?

Mr Oluwole replied: 'Well it is an issue within Rule Britannia based on the issues we were talking about. We were bragging about how we were in a position about enslaving other countries while not ourselves being slaves.

Holmes then asks him about 'the French national anthem, the Italian national anthem, the Portugese national anthem, do you think we should have an issue?

Mr Oluwole said: 'It's essentially just him [Boris Johnson] trying to provoke a culture war to distract from everything he's done, his own fact that he himself said that the problem in Africa is not that we were once in charge but that we are not in charge anymore.

Mr Farage today said that he was 'very pleased' the Mr Johnson 'said what he did', adding that the BBC had things 'hopelessly wrong'.

He added: 'The overwhelming majority of people in this country who care about this want the Proms to be as they've always been.

Dame Vera Lynn would still be singing Land of Hope and Glory if she were alive, her daughter said yesterday. Virginia Lewis-Jones said it was 'wonderful' that a rendition of the track by the forces' sweetheart topped the charts after the race row about its meaning.

Mrs Lewis-Jones, 74, claimed the song is against slavery and her mother would be proud of her for speaking out. She said: 'I feel that I can see my mother now saying 'You tell 'em girl'.

She would feel the same thing and if she were here now she would be singing it. And why don't we celebrate that fact? It had slaves working in Jamaican and Antiguan dockyards and had its ships escort slave vessels along Africa's coast, supporting the heinous trade as part of its duty to protect British sea interests.

Mr Oluwole responded to Mr Farage: 'To be honest, I'm not really going to spend a lot of time on this argument that we needed to engage in slavery in order to end slavery, and I'm going to point out the fact that as Nigel Farage just said, he said that we're coming after the culture, this is what they're doing.

Ruth Langsford asked whether we should be dwelling on incidents that were in history, and Mr Oluwole said he agreed we should be talking about more pressing issues in the present, but every time he tries to address those issues he keeps 'getting shut down'.

BBC insiders condemn bosses for 'walking into an unnecessary and absurd row' as ex-chairman Michael Grade condemns 'idiotic' and 'ghastly' censorship of 'racist' Last Night of the Proms anthems.

BBC insiders have blasted their bosses for 'walking into an unnecessary and absurd row' and making a 'ghastly mistake' by censoring the 'racist' to Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia on the Last Night of the Proms.

The decision to use instrumental versions of the patriotic anthems for the summer festival has drawn widespread anger - with staff at the corporation also venting their frustration at bosses' apparent submission to 'woke' activists who find the anthems offensive.

One senior insider said: 'This is another example of the BBC walking into a completely unnecessary and absurd row about culture. There's lots of things you can say about both of the songs and they are not up to the minute.

But that's the case with 99 per cent of our culture one way or the other. And ex-BBC chairman Michael Grade launched a blistering attack on the corporation this morning, calling the decision 'idiotic' and a 'ghastly mistake' by bosses who have 'lost touch' with the British public.

It comes as tens of thousands sign a MailOnline petition demanding that demanding that the lyrics be reinstated. The compromise was drawn up after incoming director general Tim Davie - who takes over on 1 September - after he intervened to insist both Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory were performed in some form.

BBC bosses had been considering removing both completely following criticism by woke left-wing activists claiming the lyrics about Britain 'never being enslaved' were 'racist'.

But former Tory council candidate Mr Davie intervened and is thought to want to reset the BBC's relationship with No 10 when he takes over next week.

Anger grew over the BBC's decision yesterday, with Boris Johnson condemning the corporation for 'wetness' and accusing its senior figures of harbouring a 'cringing embarrassment' for Britain's traditions.

Trevor Phillips, the former head of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, has also condemned this year's decision. Mr Phillips accused BBC bosses of being 'rooms full of white men panicking that someone is going to think they are racist'.

He said: 'The real problem the corporation has is that it is always in a panic about race, and one of the reasons it is always in a panic is that it has no confidence.

Cat Lewis said that singing about how Britons would 'never be slaves' during Rule Britannia was akin to Nazis shouting about how they would 'never be forced into a gas chamber'.

A Songs of Praise producer who compared singing Rule Britannia to Nazis singing about gas chambers has doubled down on her attack and called for the anthem to be rewritten.

She added: 'We should apologise for it properly and yet at the moment, we have NO memorial to enslaved people in the UK.

We should not celebrate slave owners. We should have anthems which celebrate what is truly great about the UK, which we can all sing and this will help unite our country.

Ms Lewis then said if she was producing the Proms, she would suggest a national competition to find new lyrics for Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory to find 'words which celebrate and unify our fantastic country, because the music to both is undoubtedly fabulous'.

The BBC vowed last night that the patriotic lyrics would return in — when the concert season finale is again performed before an audience - but it has done little to quell the anger.

BBC chairman Michael Grade told the Today programme this morning: 'This is a ghastly mistake which shows how out of touch they are with their audience.

Yesterday, the director-general Lord [Tony] Hall claimed it was a 'creative conclusion' by director David Pickard in response to Covid, insisting: 'It's very, very hard to have things where the whole audience normally sing along.

The corporation could now be forced to play the patriotic anthem properly after all, because the UK's top-selling songs are typically aired in full during BBC Radio 1's Friday chart show.

The campaign to get Dame Vera to the top of the charts was launched by a group called Defund the BBC, which states that its main goal is to decriminalise failure to pay the licence fee.

Those backing the appeal include actor Laurence Fox, who called the decision to drop the lyrics from Edward Elgar's composition 'shameful'.

Porra plays bass for Stratovarius, who have had three number 1 albums in their native Finland. The husband of the conductor in the Proms row is a guitarist for a heavy metal band that tried to release a song about Adolf Hitler.

Dalia Stasevska's husband, year-old Lauri Porra, plays bass for Stratovarius, who have had three number one albums in their native Finland.

The offending track, which the band had to drop, began with one of Hitler's speeches. At the time, lead singer Timo Tolkki said he was 'extremely interested' in the dictator but that 'hell broke loose' when he premiered the track to his German record label.

The band were formed in and have played music festivals around the world over the decades, releasing 15 studio albums, four DVDs and five live albums.

BBC insiders say Porra's year-old conductor wife is among those keen to modernise the Last Night of the Proms and reduce the patriotic elements.

She is understood to have been part of a small group behind the decision to perform Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory without lyrics next month.

Her stance has been backed by soprano Golda Schultz, who hinted at plans for a change in an interview. The South African, 36, said: 'Dalia and I want to pay tribute to the culture that has invited us into its space, and also make sure we do something that speaks to the times we are living through.

Miss Stasevska, born to a Lithuanian mother and Ukrainian father, spent the first five years of her life in Estonia. She then moved to Finland and was brought up by her father and a Finnish stepmother.

Her mother Ula Zait moved to America and now lives in Texas. He wrote online: 'Would the BBC then have to play it?

What a beautiful day that would be. By last night the song had already shot to number one in Apple's charts for its own music services.

Saying he could barely believe the BBC's decision, he added: 'It's time we stopped our cringing embarrassment about our history, about our traditions, and about our culture, and we stopped this general fight of self-recrimination and wetness, I wanted to get that off my chest.

Former chairman of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee, Damian Collins MP, added today: 'There has been a suggestion that this is because some people regard the performance of these songs as out-dated and even that some of the words are offensive.

He said : 'Any attempt to remove the right to sing Rule, Britannia! Meanwhile, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer also weighed into the row, with a Labour spokesman saying the Proms was a 'staple of the British summer' and enjoying patriotic songs 'was not a barrier to examining our past and learning lessons from it'.

The row over this year's Proms began at the weekend when it was first reported that Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory could be ditched entirely.

Critics have claimed the songs are inappropriate due to associations with colonialism and slavery. The lyrics to Rule Britannia include the line 'Britons never, never, never shall be slaves', while the words to Land of Hope and Glory were reputedly inspired by Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist and mining magnate whose statue is being removed from an Oxford college.

The switch to an instrumental version for the Last Night of the Proms pictured prompted the actor Laurence Fox to mount a social media drive to back a recording by Dame Vera Lynn, who died in June aged It was suggested that the Finnish Proms conductor, Dalia Stasevska, was keen to limit patriotic elements, and that this year — without an audience due to coronavirus — was the perfect moment for change.

Late on Monday, BBC bosses finally confirmed that the two anthems would be performed, but without the lyrics. Government officials held talks with BBC executives to urge them to rethink the decision but to no avail.

David Mellor, the Tory former culture secretary, said: 'This is a disgraceful cock-up at every level. What we get is a whole lot of woke claptrap and the BBC don't know what to do about it.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma suggested the BBC should put the lyrics on screen so viewers can decide for themselves whether to sing them.

Tensions between No 10 and the BBC have been growing since the election. Tony Hall, the BBC's outgoing director general, yesterday tried to blame the coronavirus crisis for the Proms decision, pointing out that fewer performers are allowed on stage.

Asked whether there had been a discussion about dropping songs because of their link with imperialism, Lord Hall replied: 'The whole thing has been discussed by David and his colleagues.

He defended the compromise, adding: 'It's very, very hard in an Albert Hall that takes over 5, people to have the atmosphere of the Last Night of the Proms and to have things where the whole audience normally sing along.

A BBC spokesman said last night: 'For the avoidance of any doubt, these songs will be sung next year. Kate Hoey, the former MP for Vauxhall, said the Proms was 'not worth watching' without the lyrics to the anthems.

Rule, Britannia originates from the poem of the same name by Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson, and was set to music by English composer Thomas Arne in It gained popularity in the UK after it was first played in London in and became symbolic of the British Empire, most closely associated with the British Navy.

The song has been used as part of a number of compositions, including Wagner's concert overture in D Major in and Beethoven's orchestral work, Wellington's Victory.

The song has been an integral part of the annual Remembrance Day ceremony since , when it became the first song played in the programme known as The Traditional Music.

It regained popularity at the end of WWII in after it was played at the ceremonial surrender of the Japanese imperial army in Singapore.

Left-wing critics claimed its inclusion has promoted controversy in recent years as it was deemed too patriotic.

It caught the attention of King Edward VII after it became the only piece in the history of the Proms to receive a double encore. King Edward suggested that this trio would make a good song, and so Elgar worked it into the last section of his Coronation Ode, to be performed at King Edward's coronation.

Cat Lewis tweeted: 'Do those Brits who believe it's ok to sing an 18th Century song about never being enslaved Anti-Semitism campaigner Jonathan Sacerdoti called the comparison 'outrageous'.

Several prominent left-wingers have come out against the traditional anthems in recent days. Nwanoku, founder of the Chineke!

Foundation which supports upcoming BAME musicians, told The Guardian: 'The lyrics are just so offensive, talking about the 'haughty tyrants' — people that we are invading on their land and calling them haughty tyrants — and Britons shall never be slaves, which implies that it's OK for others to be slaves but not us.

It's been irrelevant for generations, and we seem to keep perpetuating it. If the BBC are talking about Black Lives Matter and their support for the movement, how could you possibly have Rule Britannia as the last concert — in any concert?

Ms Kani, whose parents sought refuge in Britain after the partition of India in , also told the Sunday Times: 'I don't listen to Land of Hope and Glory and say 'thank God I'm British' - it actually makes me feel more alienated.

The conductor of this year's Proms, Dalia Stasevska, has reportedly voiced her desire to modernise the Proms and reduce its patriotic elements.

A corporation spokesman said: 'The decisions taken are the BBC's. At least, there is still one irredeemably British quality to this year's Last Night of the Proms: the fudge.

Not even the finest dairy herds of Devon and Cornwall could have confected something as thick, rich and clotted as the latest solution served up by the BBC.

Instead of either ignoring the usual half-hearted complaints about 'jingoism' — a recurring grumble ahead of every Last Night since the war — or else explaining why such charges are baseless, the BBC management has, this year, just caved in.

The result is a mess that has not merely satisfied no one at all but has now managed to kickstart a national debate about the BBC itself.

And it is all so needless. Come the grand finale of this year's concert, 'Rule Britannia' will be just a shrivelled morsel. A few bars of Arne's famous anthem will be bolted on to the end of the usual medley of nautical songs — but without any words.

It would have been easier for the BBC if they had simply said they were removing these pieces on a temporary basis, as indeed they did in So out they went, without complaint.

This time around, the BBC is floundering, meekly trying to blame this mess on the coronavirus while not denying that it has something to do with the culture wars raging beyond.

Yesterday, the director-general Lord [Tony] Hall claimed it was a 'creative conclusion' in response to Covid, insisting: 'It's very, very hard to have things where the whole audience normally sing along.

This argument simply falls apart given that the song which has now overtaken Elgar — 'You'll Never Walk Alone' — is a singalong classic which will be sung by the guest soprano and by the BBC Singers.

So, too, will 'Jerusalem' and the National Anthem. In other words, some songs are safe to sing in a pandemic but not others. Pull the other one.

This year's guest conductor, Finland's Dalia Stasevska, 35, reportedly regards the virus as a good excuse for pruning a much-loved script.

Miss Stasevska has made no comment and has chosen to let this remark stand. With no substantial ethnic minorities beyond a tiny percentage of Swedes and Russians, Finland is among the least diverse societies in Europe.

Finns are perhaps not best-placed to lecture the British on multiculturalism. I suggest that Miss Stasevska has a word with her compatriot, Sakari Oramo.

He was the Finnish conductor with a very difficult task — conducting the Last Night of the Proms in in the toxic aftermath of the Brexit referendum.

Back then, the BBC was crippled by the same old anxieties about orgies of jingoism. Former Proms director Nicholas Kenyon wrote darkly in the Guardian of his 'sense of foreboding that this most British of occasions might be hijacked to celebrate the triumph of Little England'.

Police haul away Extinction Rebellion activists lying in road to block Free Roulette No Money Johnson's route to Parliament The remit Contact Party Poker the BBC hasn't Casino Free Slots Games Bonus changed in years, it really is time for a review. The compromise was drawn up after incoming director general Tim Davie - who takes over on 1 September - after he intervened to insist both Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory were performed in some form. Horses portal Ios Downloader App portal. Martin Dwyer.

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He said : 'Any attempt to remove the right to sing Rule, Britannia! Meanwhile, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer also weighed into the row, with a Labour spokesman saying the Proms was a 'staple of the British summer' and enjoying patriotic songs 'was not a barrier to examining our past and learning lessons from it'.

The row over this year's Proms began at the weekend when it was first reported that Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory could be ditched entirely.

Critics have claimed the songs are inappropriate due to associations with colonialism and slavery. The lyrics to Rule Britannia include the line 'Britons never, never, never shall be slaves', while the words to Land of Hope and Glory were reputedly inspired by Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist and mining magnate whose statue is being removed from an Oxford college.

The switch to an instrumental version for the Last Night of the Proms pictured prompted the actor Laurence Fox to mount a social media drive to back a recording by Dame Vera Lynn, who died in June aged It was suggested that the Finnish Proms conductor, Dalia Stasevska, was keen to limit patriotic elements, and that this year — without an audience due to coronavirus — was the perfect moment for change.

Late on Monday, BBC bosses finally confirmed that the two anthems would be performed, but without the lyrics.

Government officials held talks with BBC executives to urge them to rethink the decision but to no avail. David Mellor, the Tory former culture secretary, said: 'This is a disgraceful cock-up at every level.

What we get is a whole lot of woke claptrap and the BBC don't know what to do about it. Business Secretary Alok Sharma suggested the BBC should put the lyrics on screen so viewers can decide for themselves whether to sing them.

Tensions between No 10 and the BBC have been growing since the election. Tony Hall, the BBC's outgoing director general, yesterday tried to blame the coronavirus crisis for the Proms decision, pointing out that fewer performers are allowed on stage.

Asked whether there had been a discussion about dropping songs because of their link with imperialism, Lord Hall replied: 'The whole thing has been discussed by David and his colleagues.

He defended the compromise, adding: 'It's very, very hard in an Albert Hall that takes over 5, people to have the atmosphere of the Last Night of the Proms and to have things where the whole audience normally sing along.

A BBC spokesman said last night: 'For the avoidance of any doubt, these songs will be sung next year. Kate Hoey, the former MP for Vauxhall, said the Proms was 'not worth watching' without the lyrics to the anthems.

Rule, Britannia originates from the poem of the same name by Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson, and was set to music by English composer Thomas Arne in It gained popularity in the UK after it was first played in London in and became symbolic of the British Empire, most closely associated with the British Navy.

The song has been used as part of a number of compositions, including Wagner's concert overture in D Major in and Beethoven's orchestral work, Wellington's Victory.

The song has been an integral part of the annual Remembrance Day ceremony since , when it became the first song played in the programme known as The Traditional Music.

It regained popularity at the end of WWII in after it was played at the ceremonial surrender of the Japanese imperial army in Singapore.

Left-wing critics claimed its inclusion has promoted controversy in recent years as it was deemed too patriotic.

It caught the attention of King Edward VII after it became the only piece in the history of the Proms to receive a double encore. King Edward suggested that this trio would make a good song, and so Elgar worked it into the last section of his Coronation Ode, to be performed at King Edward's coronation.

Cat Lewis tweeted: 'Do those Brits who believe it's ok to sing an 18th Century song about never being enslaved Anti-Semitism campaigner Jonathan Sacerdoti called the comparison 'outrageous'.

Several prominent left-wingers have come out against the traditional anthems in recent days. Nwanoku, founder of the Chineke!

Foundation which supports upcoming BAME musicians, told The Guardian: 'The lyrics are just so offensive, talking about the 'haughty tyrants' — people that we are invading on their land and calling them haughty tyrants — and Britons shall never be slaves, which implies that it's OK for others to be slaves but not us.

It's been irrelevant for generations, and we seem to keep perpetuating it. If the BBC are talking about Black Lives Matter and their support for the movement, how could you possibly have Rule Britannia as the last concert — in any concert?

Ms Kani, whose parents sought refuge in Britain after the partition of India in , also told the Sunday Times: 'I don't listen to Land of Hope and Glory and say 'thank God I'm British' - it actually makes me feel more alienated.

The conductor of this year's Proms, Dalia Stasevska, has reportedly voiced her desire to modernise the Proms and reduce its patriotic elements.

A corporation spokesman said: 'The decisions taken are the BBC's. At least, there is still one irredeemably British quality to this year's Last Night of the Proms: the fudge.

Not even the finest dairy herds of Devon and Cornwall could have confected something as thick, rich and clotted as the latest solution served up by the BBC.

Instead of either ignoring the usual half-hearted complaints about 'jingoism' — a recurring grumble ahead of every Last Night since the war — or else explaining why such charges are baseless, the BBC management has, this year, just caved in.

The result is a mess that has not merely satisfied no one at all but has now managed to kickstart a national debate about the BBC itself. And it is all so needless.

Come the grand finale of this year's concert, 'Rule Britannia' will be just a shrivelled morsel. A few bars of Arne's famous anthem will be bolted on to the end of the usual medley of nautical songs — but without any words.

It would have been easier for the BBC if they had simply said they were removing these pieces on a temporary basis, as indeed they did in So out they went, without complaint.

This time around, the BBC is floundering, meekly trying to blame this mess on the coronavirus while not denying that it has something to do with the culture wars raging beyond.

Yesterday, the director-general Lord [Tony] Hall claimed it was a 'creative conclusion' in response to Covid, insisting: 'It's very, very hard to have things where the whole audience normally sing along.

This argument simply falls apart given that the song which has now overtaken Elgar — 'You'll Never Walk Alone' — is a singalong classic which will be sung by the guest soprano and by the BBC Singers.

So, too, will 'Jerusalem' and the National Anthem. In other words, some songs are safe to sing in a pandemic but not others.

Pull the other one. This year's guest conductor, Finland's Dalia Stasevska, 35, reportedly regards the virus as a good excuse for pruning a much-loved script.

Miss Stasevska has made no comment and has chosen to let this remark stand. With no substantial ethnic minorities beyond a tiny percentage of Swedes and Russians, Finland is among the least diverse societies in Europe.

Finns are perhaps not best-placed to lecture the British on multiculturalism. I suggest that Miss Stasevska has a word with her compatriot, Sakari Oramo.

He was the Finnish conductor with a very difficult task — conducting the Last Night of the Proms in in the toxic aftermath of the Brexit referendum.

Back then, the BBC was crippled by the same old anxieties about orgies of jingoism. Former Proms director Nicholas Kenyon wrote darkly in the Guardian of his 'sense of foreboding that this most British of occasions might be hijacked to celebrate the triumph of Little England'.

As ever, it was nonsense — as I discovered when I went along myself. The only people who hijacked the event were an enterprising band of Remainers who had purchased a lorry load of EU flags which were given to everyone going through the door.

A few Brexiteers tried to do the same with Union flags. Mr Oramo ignored it all. Perhaps the loudest cheer of the night came when he led on his star vocalist, Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Florez, to sing Rule Britannia - originating from a poem by James Thomson.

Florez had come not in white tie and tails, nor dressed as Britannia. Instead, he was in the full regalia of the King of the Incas, complete with feathered cloak and Sun God helmet.

The audience was ecstatic. Here was a proud Peruvian in ancient native dress, conducted by a proud Finn, leading the entire Albert Hall — plus tens of thousands gathered around the jumbo screens in Hyde Park, Glasgow and elsewhere plus millions more watching on telly — in a bravura rendition of one of Britain's best-loved tunes.

It was a perfect illustration of a point completely lost on these panicky BBC executives: the Last Night is a global event.

It is also one with a healthy sense of irony — an alien concept, of course, to the woke. The thing which most sticks in my mind about that night in like all the other Last Nights, in fact is the range of nationalities.

In addition to the EU and Union flags, the next most popular is usually that of Germany. Elgar, right composed Land of Hope and Glory.

People get up at all hours around the world to tune in and hold 'Last Night' parties. For many of them, it is a lifelong ambition to get a ticket to the real thing.

All those German and Japanese viewers will be just as dismayed as the crustiest British ancient mariner this year when they witness Miss Stasevska's joyless, truncated snippet of a wordless Rule Britannia.

Is Rule Britannia really so offensive compared to the lyrics of other countries' hymns? Judge for yourself Let's march, let's march, that their impure blood should water our fields.

The US anthem celebrates 'bombs bursting in the air' as they 'gave proof through the night that our flag was still there'.

It then celebrates the spilling of 'their blood'… for 'conquer we must'. This eagle that drunk the blood of Italy and Poland, together with the Cossack.

Remembering the Ottoman Empire as a 'barbarian nation', Hungary's anthem still includes the following suspect line about the suffering it endured at the hands of a nearby neighbour: 'the Turks' slave yoke we took upon our shoulders'.

The patriotic banners saturate in waves of blood. Sir Henry Wood's Promenade Concerts to give them their full name have always been the greatest festival of world music anywhere.

They are anything but a celebration of national music, like so many lesser festivals. Those eccentrics with their little rituals whom viewers always see at the front of the Last Night crowd are very serious about their music.

I have interviewed a few of them over the years. They are an eclectic bunch but the last thing you can accuse them of is jingoism. They might sing Rule Britannia with gusto but they will have been just as enthusiastic for the French, African, Indian — even Finnish — music at other concerts over the season.

Besides, Rule Britannia has nothing to do with 'enslavement' as its critics claim. Indeed, the words are an exhortation, not a triumphalist boast.

Note that the words say 'Britannia, rule the waves' — not 'rules'. The song was written for an 18th-century royal masque about Alfred the Great defeating the Vikings.

It acquired its popularity not as a military marching tune, like, say, France's unashamedly brutal Marseillaise, but as a catchy musical number sung by barmaid-turned-West End star, Kitty Clive.

In other words, it's a Georgian X-Factor hit. It then went on to be a favourite tune of the Royal Navy — the same navy, of course, which abolished slavery.

Similarly, Elgar's Land of Hope and Glory was called no such thing when it was first performed at the Proms in — because Arthur Benson had not yet got round to writing any words.

It was just Pomp and Circumstance March No. These songs have never been imposed on the British public — like a national anthem or school song — but they endure through their universal appeal.

Like all the other Prommers, they were there for the music and for the occasion. It is often said that the BBC is far too sensitive to the prevailing wind on Twitter.

So the Broadcasting House high-ups must have been mortified to see that the most popular Twitter thread yesterday lunchtime was ' DefundtheBBC' followed closely by ' RuleBritannia'.

Then, the Prime Minister weighed in for the second day running, accusing the BBC of 'cringing' and 'wetness'. They need not cringe. Rather, they should point out that it was the BBC which saved the Proms from insolvency in and which has kept it all going ever since with generations of great musicians, conductors and presenters.

Then they should tell their critics on both sides to pipe down and enjoy the music. But perhaps, we should have seen this coming.

It was entitled, simply, 'Woke'. The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Argos AO. Royal Ascot considers axing Rule Britannia and Land of Hope And Glory from traditional singalong amid fears of a backlash over 'racism' Queen's favourite sporting event Royal Ascot considers axing both anthems Hundreds of race-goers gather every year to belt the songs at the bandstand Festival bosses fear the inclusion of Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory would cause a 'backlash' and create 'most unwelcome attention' It comes as the BBC is strongly condemned over its decision to censor the lyrics of the Proms anthems because woke activists find them 'racist' By Jack Wright For Mailonline Published: BST, 27 August Updated: BST, 27 August e-mail 14k shares.

Share this article Share. Wider still, and wider Shall thy bounds be set; God, who made thee mighty Make thee mightier yet! Dear Land of Hope, thy hope is crowned God make thee mightier yet!

On Sov'ran brows, beloved, renowned Once more thy crown is set Thine equal laws, by Freedom gained Have ruled thee well and long; By Freedom gained, by Truth maintained Thine Empire shall be strong Thy fame is ancient as the days As Ocean large and wide: A pride that dares, and heeds not praise A stern and silent pride Not that false joy that dreams content With what our sires have won; The blood a hero sire hath spent Still nerves a hero son.

What about other countries? France: La Marseillaise 'They're coming right into your arms, to cut the throats of your sons, your comrades!

Portugal: A Portuguesa 'To march against the enemy guns! Comments Share what you think. View all. More top stories.

Bing Site Web Enter search term: Search. Today's headlines Most Read Astonishing images show exhausted migrants struggling ashore and collapsing on a Dover beach after four UK announces 10 more coronavirus deaths in early count as local infection rates show Corby and South Steakhouse owner hits back at irate customer who complained about a minute wait and then threatened to John Boyega slams Disney and claims his Star Wars character was 'sidelined' while 'the nuance' was given to What is the best day for Royal Ascot?

How do you bet and what on earth are you going to wear!? Royal Ascot is a 5 day event with different races and cups up for grabs. It all kicks off or runs off on Tuesday 16th June and is a very popular day to visit.

The crowds are eager to get the 5 day horse racing festival started off with a bang so this is a great day to soak up the atmosphere, if you can get time off work that is.

With no work in the morning the drinks start flowing early and the atmosphere really becomes electric with each race. So what is the best day for Royal Ascot?

Well that depends on your preferences. Tuesday for civilised atmosphere , Wednesday for big bets , Thursday for people watching , Friday and Saturday for partying!

A prime example of how to dress up and what you can expect on the Thursday. There are plenty of great vantage points as the course is long and panoramic.

Of course the finish line is where everyone wants to be so expect more crowds there. So its definitely who you know here! Anyone that has been declared bankrupt or has a criminal record are refused entry and there used to be a rule that no divorcees were allowed in too.

Royal Ascot Day Perfekte Royal Ascot Day 2 Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-​Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo. 12 Uhr Präsentation des diesjährigen Royal Ascot Day – Cocktails Bei Weinbau-​Familie Leopold mit den schönen Blumen von Frau Erna am. - After a gloriously sunny first day at Ascot, day two dawned wet and windy. ROYAL ASCOT DAY 1! ⁣ ⁣ My outfit today is from the incredible new collection @catherinewalkerlondon with a hat to match as well! 🥰⁣ ⁣. ROYAL ASCOT DAY 1! ⁣ ⁣ My outfit today is from the incredible new collection @catherinewalkerlondon with a hat to match as well! 🥰⁣ ⁣.

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